Potential for Instability in Uzbekistan

Key details:

2/09/2016 from Japan

  • Diplomatic sources told Reuters that Uzbek President Islam Karimov has died after suffering a stroke at the age of 78.
  • He did not designate his successor.
  • No official statement is released, and other sources cannot be seen on social medias.
  • The government admitted the president was in a critical condition.
  • He has ruled the country since 1989, and he was an authoritarian.

INC000133

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-uzbekistan-president-idUSKCN1180WG?utm_campaign=trueAnthem:+Trending+Content&utm_content=57c947c504d301131c97da44&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter

http://www.euronews.com/2016/09/02/uzbek-president-islam-karimov-in-critical-condition-government-admits

 

Assessment:

The death of the authoritarian leader can make the country destabilized. In Central Asia, more young and disaffected people are influenced by Islamism. Corruption and violation of human rights have been reported. According to an article from Reuter, it is likely that next leader will be decided behind closed doors by a small group. If his successor is not accepted by people, the country can be unstable.

http://www.economist.com/news/asia/21701522-five-former-soviet-republics-struggle-survive-new-great-game-stans-undelivered?zid=306&ah=1b164dbd43b0cb27ba0d4c3b12a5e227

http://uzbekconsulny.org/consulate/index.php/en/en-about-uzbekistan/en-people